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Apache Kid Wilderness Area

apache kid

Year Established:1980

Size:44,650 acres

Description:

The Apache Kid, an Indian who raised the anger of local ranchers with his raids, was hunted down and killed here. A tree was blazed at the site of the Kid’s undoing, a blaze still visible today. This terrain in the southern San Mateo Mountains is extremely rugged with many narrow and steep canyons bisecting high mountain peaks. Elevations rise to over 10,000 feet and the vegetation is typical of this region of New Mexico: pinyon-juniper woodlands lower down, spruce and fir and aspen higher up, ponderosa pine in between. The wildlife diversity finds few equals within the state in diversity: Coue’s white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk, black bear, bobcat, cougar, antelope, javelina, coyote, rabbit, squirrel, quail and turkey to name some of the more common animals.

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APlaces

Argus Range Wilderness Area

17

Year Established:1994

Size:74,890 acres

Description:

Stretching along the Argus Range, a long and narrow north-south mountain chain, the Argus Range Wilderness lies 28 miles long, nowhere more than five miles wide and on the west side of Panamint Valley, just south and west of Death Valley National Park and just east of the China Lake Naval Weapons Center. (If the Navy decides to install a space energy laser facility within 15 years after Wilderness designation, a road may be built across the area.) Elevations here vary from about 2,800 feet on the east side to more than 7,500 feet on the west side. The Argus Range is comprised of dry desert mountains with steep slopes and highly dissected canyons. Remains of old mining activity and a few prehistoric sites are scattered throughout the Wilderness. You may find several small springs supporting a small population of desert bighorn sheep. Vegetation includes creosote scrub plant communities on the lower slopes, occasional pinyon-juniper communities on the higher slopes and virtually nothing on the steep slopes and canyon walls.

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APlaces

Arctic Wilderness Area

16

Year Established:1980

Size: 8,000,000 acres

Description:

Nowhere else in America has been impacted less by humans than the northeastern corner of Alaska. Here the Brooks Range bulges up near the Arctic Ocean creating a unique combination of landscapes and habitats including arctic, subarctic and alpine ecosystems. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, approximately 200 miles by 200 miles, almost 20 million acres, the size of South Carolina, here stretches down both sides of the Brooks Range. Peaks reaching 9,000 feet, highest in the Brooks, look northward across rolling treeless tundra cut by serpentine rivers and dotted with clusters of freshwater lakes and on to the barrier islands and saltwater lagoons of the Arctic Ocean. Southward the terrain drops from treeless mountains into broad conifer and hardwood-covered valleys. Here you’ll find mammals abundant by Arctic standards: brown bears, moose, wolves, wolverines and red foxes everywhere; Dall sheep and marmots in the high mountains; black bears, coyotes, lynx, porcupines and beavers in the forestland; muskoxen and arctic foxes on the north slopes; polar bears on the ice pack; and the 110,000-member Porcupine caribou herd in winter in the southern portion. Beluga and bowhead whales migrate along the coast with ringed and bearded seals. Migratory birds flock here, some arriving all the way from Antarctica.

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